A “Common Perception”

The historic perception of a farmer is someone who lives an insular life segregated from the world at large. I must admit that there are a few ways that this is true. Farmers are separated from the outside world in a sense geographically. A large proportion of their job is spent working on their farm which is, by definition, separate from “not the farm”. A lot of this time is usually spent working alone or with only a few others who also usually spend  a lot of their time on the farm. There is not a lot of outside exposure here.

There is one huge way that rural folks are not insular. Farmers depend on the news and weather. The biological nature of farming in general is very affected by weather. Farmers like to know whether it is going to stay wet or dry, hotter or colder. The weather affects both livestock and crops. They need to adjust feeding, watering, fertilizing, chemical application, planting, harvesting, and innumerable other work according to the forecast.

There are many other types of information that are basic to the everyday operation and the long term operation of farming and ranching. Farmers live in a world of GPS enabled, computer aided, machinery. and depend on satellite imagery for their weather predictions. This is a world that is becoming more and more information dependent and there is no faster or more efficient way to get that information than being on-line. One way to get this vital information is through directed Agricultural publications like Ozarks Farm & Neighbor.

Ozarks Farm & Neighbor is a farming and ranching targeted paper that is direct mailed every three weeks. It is a paper publication but it also has an on-line presence. This was not an easy decision to make. Companies have to make money to stay in business and all businesses have to show some type of return on investment on every aspect of what they do to stay competitive. The Editor of their online aspect had to prove the value of that aspect. Their 1400 Facebook followers are getting more exposure to OF&N’s Advertisers, News Presence, and articles. Their advertisers are getting more out of their on-line presence through the inter-connected and searchable essence of the internet. This is a presence that will only grow over time due to the increasing availability of high speed rural internet and cellular smart phone access.

This also changes the demographics of their audience. Their 58,000 subscribers are generally age 35 -64 living in Southwest Missouri, Northwest Arkansas, and Eastern Oklahoma. Being online allows OF&N to reach anyone on the net anywhere in the world at any time. This is a huge difference from a paper lying folded up on the end table next to the couch underneath  the Bass Pro catalog.

Ozarks Farm & Neighbor has a presence on Facebook and Twitter. Their goal is to be story driven and informational. Their on-line aspect allows them to update  and react to the news cycle in a much more timely fashion than once every three weeks. Their Facebook page has a “Breaking news” segment, “Links” to other online sites (This is priceless interconnectedness. Now their readers are one click away from being OF&N readers), a “Subscription” link to get the paper, and a link to “Extended Stories” and “National and Regional News”. OF&N becomes a “one-stop-shop” for vital decision making information.

The classic version of the American farmer is someone wearing overalls standing in a field surrounded by cows and/ or corn.1931570-ia2_grantwood_american_gothic_1930

The new version may have that same farmer holding a smart phone or tablet instead of a pitchfork. I urge you to check out Ozarks Farm and Neighbor and see what is going on in rural America.

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